Tactical Core

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Battlefield Tactics

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Shield

In most cases the shield is more than strong enough to stop and attack by a similar size opponent using the weapons of the era. In old fashion warfare the shield is a very important piece of kit, if not the most important piece of kit. It is the one thing that is going to save your life more than anything else (it will even stop arrows).

 

Shield Wall [Tactics]

As you have seen the shield is an exceptionally effective defence tool, but only to the facing side. In order to make best use of a shield and to maximise it's effect, the Shield Wall tactic was invented. This basically stops the enemy from sidestepping any individual Trooper by putting another Trooper to the side. By presenting a united front of close grouped and organised Troopers the enemy is faced with a solid wall of shields (hence the name). With this tactic the foundations of formation regiments were set, and discipline was paramount. Of coarse you need open space for such formations (no good for the tribes in forests of Germany) and this tactic first appears in the middle-east around 3,000 BCE, in Mesopotamia.

 

The problem now is how do you overcome a shield wall? With such a powerful defence and the virtual invulnerability to direct attack, lunge or skilled, how did the warriors of old take down a shield wall?

 

The answer is surprisingly simple: brute force and teamwork. When two armies with shield walls meet; it is literally a stale-mate in skill combat terms. Nothing is going to happen except people are going to get boarded. Instead they push on each other's shield wall in an attempt to dislodge one 'brick' from the wall. If you observe the diagram to the right of Red and Blue's shield walls, Red 2 has managed to dislodge Blue 2 from Blue's shield wall. However, as we know from the shield rules this doesn't give any advantage to Red 2 against Blue 2, but look at Blue 1 and Blue 3.

 

Red 2 is now at a breach point, and while it would be pointless to attack Blue 1 (due to Blue 1's facing shield and the fact that Red 2 would have to turn around to strike, thus exposing their non-shield right-hand side to Blue 2 - and blue 2 will attack is Red 2 is stupid enough to do this), Blue 3 if fair game.

 

As Red 2 pushes back Blue 2, there is a window of opportunity to strike. If Red 2 manages to make a counter roll (under FS+SC which is pretty much 'auto'), instead of directing it towards Blue 2 (which is pretty much useless) they direct it to Blue 3. Blue 3 is fighting Red 3 and can't defend themselves from this redirected counter attack. Instead, the chances are that Blue 3 will try to fall back as soon as Red 2 passed him rather than face dieing next round, but in so doing they will expose Blue 4. This will force Blue 4 to fall back. The wall is failing, and what we have is basically a flank attack in the middle of the wall.

 

Once in the open, Red 2 and Blue 2 are basically fighting an individual-out-of-formation duel. If Blue 2 wins they can rush back and attack Red 3, force Red 3 to fall back or get cut down. If Red 2 wins and slays Blue 2, they are behind the shield wall and can rear-attack any of Blue (most likely Blue 1, as Red 3 is capping the other side.). The shield wall of Blue has failed. Once Red 3 has hacked down a few on the left to free up a few more Red, the Reds can then flank either of Blue's two halves.

 

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[Flank attacks and why they are so dangerous.

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[Counter tactics. RANKS

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Squares

The Infantry Square is an anti-cavalry formation. It was used by the Romans, the Han Empire, the Pike Square and perhaps most famous during the Napoleonic wars and the battle of Waterloo. The basic concept is to stop the Cavalry from out flanking a line of infantry, by either forming a complete circle or a Square so there are Troopers facing all directions at once.

 

 

 

 

 


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This file last modified 06/25/16