Tactical Core

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Resolving actions

As the Retaliator is 'reactive', and is actually going to be doing something while you are resolving your action, both have to be resolved together. This combined resolution is at the heart of the Warspike system, and allows for dynamic fast flowing battles. The various combinations of action vs reaction are collected below. These are guidelines and in any game common sense should prevail (or if in competition the Referee's sense prevails).

 


 

Move action vs active Opponent

This covers the resolution when the Instigator makes a Move Action and the Retaliator makes a Move Reaction in response. The Retaliator can only respond to the Instigator unit that is active, they can not use this 'reaction' as an excuse to move elsewhere, the reaction is limited, and not to a freedom move as the instigator's is.

 

Move vs (counter) Move

If the Instigator's active unit moves then any unit of the Retaliator that sees them (Line of Sight) may chose to move in response as a reaction. This is resolved together within the same turn using increments as a guide to orchestrate events. The number of increments in a turn is 10.

 

Order

  • Every increment both the Instigator and Retaliator may move. The Retaliator unit may move directly towards the Instigator unit, the Retaliator may 'stand their ground' or move directly away from the Instigator unit. This can be played out as a series of little jumps per increment, but it is quicker to use it as a rule of thumb.
  • Alternatively the Retaliator can move directly to the nearest cover or the nearest friendly unit.

This allows two units moving towards each other to meet in the middle.

 

Note: Move-shoot-move is a Skirmisher tactic and covered in Augment: Skirmisher. It was rear for a regiment or unit using Bows and Arrows or Muskets to move about an fire. They usually shot from barricade/ improvised fortifications, backup up by infantry as they are vulnerable to fast moving Cavalry. The only time this tactic turns up during the pre-automatic weapons era is with Skirmishers, though this tact turns up a lot in fast moving modern fire-fights (gotta get into the mind set!).

 

Charge: If the Instigator unit 'charges' a Retaliator unit and the Retaliator responds with a counter charge; the two meet in the middle. Use the move increments as a guide to work out where they will meet on the battle field. Charge speed is four times that of Quick March -that's four times base Stature in yards.

 

Alternatively the Retaliator may hold fast and facer the charge.

 

Options: Shock Attack/ Fear Test. Charging is a shock attack and if you are using Augment: Psychology, then then the leader if the Instigator unit must make a command test to initiate the charge, the Retaliator unit must make fear test is faced with a charge.

 

Moving while being shot at

If the Instigator's active unit moves then any unit of the Retaliator that sees them (Line of Sight) may chose to shoot at them in response as a reaction. This is resolved together within the same turn using increments as a guide to orchestrate events. The number of increments in a turn is 10.

 

Order

  • Every time the Instigator unit moves within an increment the Retaliator unit may fire any loaded weapons upon them (and only them, the Retaliator may not target another of the Instigators units which are not active). The Retaliator must have a loaded weapon to fire within a given increment, otherwise increments are used to reload the weapon.

By way of example;

In fig 1 the Instigator (I1) and Retaliator (R1) are facing each other around 100yards apart, and both have a Stature of '6'. The grey wedge on the marker and the dotted lines are to show the '90° arc of fire'.

In fig 2 the Instigator decides on action and charges R1 at full sprint speed. Although the Instigator can easily make up the distance in one turn, the Instigator can not make the whole move in one increment (3 seconds). Instead the Instigator will cover 36yards in this first increment, and close the distance down to 64yards.

In fig 3 the Retaliator may now take their reaction for the same increment. They decide to shoot at the charging Instigator. They make the necessary dice rolls to determine the effectiveness of the shots. The Retaliator misses and the Instigator lives to perform another action in the next increment.

In fig 4 we see the Instigator decides to continue the charge and make another 'step' of 36yards towards the Retaliator.

In fig 5 the Retaliator may perform yet another reaction. Examples of reactions include;

  • If the Retaliator is armed with (at least) a semi-automatic weapon they would be able to fire again.
  • If they are armed with a manual loading weapon, that can be reloaded in one increment (bolt-action rifle for example) they could reload ready for the next increment.
  • If their weapon would take longer than 1 increment to reload they would realise they do not have time to reload and draw a hand weapon and prepare to take the charge (bayonets ready for firearms and hand-weapons and maybe a buckler for an archer)
  • If they have firearms with bayonets they could decide to counter charge at the last moment, and advance one increment towards the Instigator!

Optional

Move to augment

 

Dodge and Evade: A Retaliator unit that that sees the Instigator unit move can run (or drive) for cover. Once in cover they Retaliator's unit can 'hide'. The Instigator's unit may advance on the Retaliator unit's position that has gone to ground.

 

The Retaliator unit remains on the table top once in cover, but they are out of Line of Sight and any further moves can not be seen. If none of the Instigators other units can see them then this hidden Retaliator unit can not be tracked. Hidden units can make hidden moves in coordination with the Referee.

 

Hidden: Hidden units are not place on the table top. A Retaliator unit that is hidden that sees the Instigator can duck and remain hidden. They count as 'hidden'. This means the Instigator does not have Line of Sight and can not act towards the hidden Retaliator's unit directly, though the Instigator may take precautions and set up defences or approach with caution.

 

Hidden Moves are worked out with the Referee, and points where they can be spotted have to be worked out. in the Core rules spotting is automatic, any exposure (line of Sight) results in both sides being instantly aware of each other.

 


 

Shooting action vs active opponent

This covers the resolution when the Instigator makes a Shot Action and the Retaliator makes a Shot Reaction or Move Reaction in response. The Retaliator can only respond to the Instigator unit that is active, they can not use this 'reaction' as an excuse to shot another Instigator unit or charge another Instigator unit or move towards another Instigator unit elsewhere The Retaliator unit's target selection is strictly limited to the Instigator's active unit.

 

Shoot vs (counter) Move

As soon of the Instigator activates a unit for an action they become a possible target. In the case of shooting, as soon as they fire they can be targeted. Once shots are fired, the Retaliator can react immediately. Both Sides use the turn increments to moderate the shooting and movement between them. It takes one increment to aim and fire, one increment to move and one or more increments to reload a missile weapon. As a point of advantage for being the Instigator the Retaliator always looses the first increment.

 

Order

  • Every time the Instigator does something in an increment the Retaliator can do something to. Only the active Instigator unit and their opponent Retaliator unit are considered in this resolution. the turn is ordered around the increments.

This allows for dynamic battles.

 

Example: You are the Instigator. You look around the gaming table and see an enemy unit that is a bit too close and seems to be trying to out flank your Musketeers. You do not want this and blast them. In the first increment you roll up shots and kill 3 of the Retaliator's unit. The Retaliator's unit can now act as you have fired on them, and without hesitation they start to charge you! They start charging on the second increment just as your Musketeers start reloading. It will take four increments to reload, so the Retaliator's unit can make four increments worth of movement before you can fire, and they cover a lot of ground (roughly 80 yards). You fire again on the six increment, killing 4 more. Once again your reload, however they are only 40 yards away and will mange to engage before your Musketeers have reloaded. Therefore the Sergeant orders that they ready bayonets (count as spear) to meet the charge.

 

Example: You are the Instigator. You look around the gaming table and see an enemy unit skulking in front of a wall some distance away. You open fire and fail to kill any of them. In reaction the Retaliator's unit uses the second increment to dive over to the other side of the wall in order to make use of it as cover. Although normally you would have the chance to fire another round, these cowardly devils keep their heads down and they are no longer a target. You may reload but you may not pick another unit to shoot and and have to wait.

 

Shoot vs (counter) Shoot

The Instigator shoots at a Retaliator's unit. This Action allows the Retaliator's unit to return fire. The Instigator's volley is resolved first on the first increment, followed by the Retaliator unit on the second increment. Once the two initial volleys have been fired it is down to reload times to see who will shoot next.

 

Example: You are the Instigator. You look around the gaming table and see an enemy unit that has been marching towards your main 20 man Musketeer unit all battle, and they are now close enough to engage (if you don't do it now, they surely will next turn!). You open fire in the first increment and drop 5 of the Retaliator's 20 man unit. The remaining 15 return fire on the second increment and drop 3 of yours. Both have to reload, but your Musketeers are an increment ahead and will get to fire four increments after their first shot (three increment after the Retaliator unit's shot).

 

Note: 'Shoot and charge' in the same turn is part of the Augment: Skirmisher.

 


 

Close combat action vs active opponent

This covers the resolution of Close Combat as part of the turn sequence. As the opponent is 'reactive', and actually doing something while you are resolving your action, both have to be resolved together.

 

Combat vs (counter) Move

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Counter move? Move away? Rout? Dodge (but not when rank and file)

 

Move and counter strike - move from base contact and can struck - rout

 

Combat vs (counter) Shoot

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Include shooting into combat (fire on allies or third party)

 

Combat vs (counter) Combat

Fight!

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Combat Resolution

 


 

Specials

The Special actions are separate from regular actions as they are variable. They have to be treated on an individual basis. 'Specials' is also a place holder for Augment rules that expand the core options.

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Copyright © Philip Sibbering 2007-2013. WarSpike™ is a Trademark of Philip Sibbering.

This file last modified 06/25/16